Heroes

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               FADE IN:



               EXT. RESIDENTIAL/URBAN STREET -- DAY

               Sustained shot of a 3 year-old girl flying overhead, a look
               of distress on her face. Slow motion.

                                                                CUT TO:



               SOUND: SCREECH OF BRAKES, SYMBOLIC OF AN AUTO ACCIDENT



               INT. COLLEGE DORM ROOM -- NIGHT

               CLEO awakes with a start, unnerved by this nightmare.
               Gradually, her eyes close again as she falls back to sleep. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. COLLEGE CLASS ROOM -- DAY

               Cleo sits in class listening to the PROFESSOR intone his
               lecture on (?). She appears slightly preoccupied, yet still
               half-attentive.



               EXT. COLLEGE CAMPUS -- DAY

               Cleo walking to her next class (side profile). She glances up
               as she passes someone familiar to her, a boyfriend. This is
               Mel.

                                   MEL
                         How'd you do?

                                   CLEO
                         I think pretty good; I studied.

                                   MEL 
                         Studied? Or (emulating falling
                         asleep) "studied"?

               She bumps into him playfully. 

                                   CLEO
                         I mean really studied. It's not my
                         subject. 

                                   MEL
                         Is tonight coffee night?

                                   CLEO
                         Yeah, I don't have classes
                         tomorrow.

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. DINER -- NIGHT

               Cleo sits in a booth looking out at the night traffic.

               Mel eats a hot fudge Sundae. 

                                   MEL
                         Tomorrow ... movies? What do you
                         want to see?

                                   CLEO
                         I don't know. Something funny.
                         Don't you ever need to study?

                                   MEL
                         Mm-mm ... genius.

               Cleo laughs.

                                   CLEO 
                         You aren't!

                                   MEL
                         I blow off studying a lot. You know
                         that. Studying what I'm supposed
                         to, anyway. I'm writing a story
                         about Vietnam. I study that more
                         than Statistics 101. It's
                         unbelievable what went on over
                         there. 

                                   CLEO
                         Like what? 

               Mel feeds her a spoonful of Sundae. 

                                   MEL
                         Like losing but not losing. People
                         here didn't want it, so our people
                         over there had to evacuate the
                         country. People were hanging off of
                         helicopters. That was Saigon, 1975.
                         Roy says we got out of Iraq before
                         it came to the same thing. 

               Cleo is quietly amused by this.

                                   CLEO
                         Your brother still think 9/11 was
                         an inside job?

                                   MEL
                             (Growing serious )
                         Because it was!

               Cleo shakes her head in dismissive wonder. 

                                   MEL (CONT'D)
                         Steel doesn't melt at--

                                   CLEO
                         I had that dream again. The one
                         about flying.

               Mel idly twirls his spoon in his Sundae, attentive. 

               The bell over the door RINGS and both look to see a man
               enter, approximately 60 years old. He never looks at them,
               but takes a seat on the nearest stool. A WAITRESS arrives to
               take his order. 

                                   CLEO (CONT'D)
                         I'm flying through the air, like
                         someone throwing me. And just
                         before I hit the ground, I wake up. 

                                   MEL
                         Well, obviously you're not dying.
                         Otherwise, you would in real life.
                         That's what they say.

                                   CLEO 
                         I know what they say. 

               Mel feeds her another spoonful of Sundae. 

                                   CLEO (CONT'D)
                         I think that's a myth. I think I've
                         died in dreams before, or knew I
                         was about to. 

                                   MEL
                             (Leading her)
                         Is that the same thing?
                         Anticipating and experiencing?

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. GRASSY CURB -- DAY

               A flashback shows us a 3 year-old Cleo rolling in the grass
               as she comes to a spot. 

               She looks up at the direction from which she was thrown,
               shock or wonder in her eyes. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. DINER -- NIGHT

                                   CLEO
                         I don't know if it's something I
                         saw on TV or what, but I keep
                         picturing it at the weirdest times.
                         It's the third dream now. 

               Mel continues twirling his spoon in his Sundae, concerned for
               her. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. HOME KITCHEN -- NEXT EVENING

               Cleo's MOM is at the sink. Cleo sets the table. They sit down
               as her younger brother STEVE comes in from outside and her
               FATHER comes down from upstairs. Everyone eventually
               gravitates to the table. 

               MOM makes everyone link hands. Steve is resigned to it. They
               all link hands.

                                   MOM
                         Come Lord Jesus, be our guest, and
                         let this food for us be blessed. By
                         His hand we all our fed, give us
                         Lord our daily bread. Amen.

               Steaming bowls are passed around. 

                                   STEVE
                         So, what's Mel up to?

                                   CLEO
                         5' 10", I think.

               Father smirks.

                                   MOM
                         He's not getting in the way of your
                         studies, is he? How'd the test go?

                                   CLEO 
                         Won't know 'til Tuesday. 

                                   FATHER
                         What test?

                                   CLEO
                         60's Political History.

                                   FATHER
                         You study?

                                   CLEO
                         Of course. And no, Mel doesn't get
                         in the way. We're studying
                         different subjects. 

                                   FATHER
                         He know what he's going to do, yet?

                                   CLEO
                         He wants to be a writer.

               Father scoffs. No one else does. 

                                   MOM
                             (To Steve)
                         What about your test, hon?

               On the kitchen counter, a small TV is on with the sound off.
               Steve ignores the question and points out the news to the
               others. 

                                   STEVE
                         Two murders now.

               Father looks at him, off guard, then looks to the TV himself.

               On screen is an artist's sketch of a middle aged man wearing
               glasses and a fishing cap, with hooks all around it.

                                   FATHER
                         I heard about it on the way home. 

                                   STEVE
                         They're saying it might be a serial
                         killer.

                                   CLEO
                         Fruity Pebbles or Alpha Bits?

               Mom laughs, her back to the TV everyone else is now paying
               more attention to.

                                   MOM
                         Don't let your food get cold.

                                   STEVE
                         Dad, you think it's a serial
                         killer?

                                   FATHER
                         I think it's a couple of murders,
                         that's all. The cops are guessing.

                                   STEVE
                         How do you know?

                                   MOM
                         Guys, c'mon, save the murders for
                         dessert, at least. 

                                   CLEO
                         I had this dream the night before.
                         Flying through the air, and maybe
                         hitting the ground, I don't
                         remember. I saw something like it
                         on a TV show, or movie, whatever it
                         was. Didn't you say once that I was
                         in some kind of accident? Like, a
                         car accident?

               Father looks at his daughter sharply, but also has a good
               poker face. He glances to his wife. 

                                   MOM
                         Yeah, sort of. You weren't in the
                         car. You were in the street. I
                         turned around for three seconds and
                         when I turned back, you were
                         running toward the street. 

                                   CLEO
                         You told me I tripped over
                         something and hit the sidewalk.

                                   MOM
                             (Hesitating)
                         Yeah. That's right. 

               Father's face is grim. 

                                   STEVE
                         What if it is a serial killer? Will
                         there be a curfew?

                                   CLEO
                         What do you care? You have to be in
                         bed by nine anyway.

                                   STEVE
                         Summer's comin'. 

                                   CLEO
                             (To Mom)
                         You ever dream about something more
                         than once?

                                   MOM
                         ...No. I don't think I ever have.
                         Of course, nobody remembers all of
                         their dreams, so maybe. 

               Mom's disposition has grown slightly darker, but still
               remains unnoticed by her kids. 

               On the TV screen, we see a body on a stretcher being loaded
               onto an ambulance. There is a sheet over the body from head
               to toe, yet there's no other indication this is even part of
               the same story. Over this we hear a CRASH...

               Mom jumps visibly, and turns to see the family dog, REGGIE,
               standing up with paws on the counter, knocking down a plate
               of something.

                                   FATHER
                         Reggie, get out of those veggies! 

               Steve and Cleo both laugh at the rhyme. 

               He stands to tend to the mess while the dog leaves the scene
               of the crime. On his way past his wife, he lays a hand on her
               shoulder but the act is so subtle as to go unnoticed. 

               Over this, we hear the loud bray of a truck's HORN.

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. CLEO'S ROOM -- NIGHT

               Her eyes snap open from the sound. It's the dream, again, but
               this time no visuals survive. She blinks, and we see her
               trying to remember. 

               She rises to an elbow and gropes around on her nightstand for
               the TV remote. It's the light from the screen that eventually
               lights her, as well. Resting on an elbow, she watches... 

               Cleo's POV: an infomercial about real estate. The sound is
               muted. She flips the channel and sees David Bowie on stage,
               circa 1973, with a big head of fuchsia hair.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME - SAME NIGHT

               Cleo ventures out into the silence of a sleeping street, just
               her and the streetlights. She sits at the top of the steps
               leading down to the sidewalk, restless and tired at the same
               time. She looks down to...

               ...the grassy curb between sidewalk and street. 

               A moment of contemplation segues into... 



               EXT. GRASSY CURB -- DAY

               The house next door. In sepia tones, we see a man come out
               onto the porch in slow motion, leaping down the stairs and
               running toward the street...

               3 year-old Cleo, still laying on the grass, is watching the
               street but is distracted by the sight of the man running. 

               Mom, on the porch, is running down the porch steps, and her
               face is suddenly frozen in horror as she realizes what's
               happened. The sound of the truck's horn blaring is distant
               and dull, as if heard from a great distance.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/PORCH -- NIGHT

               Cleo turns her head to look at the same general space where
               her mom was standing on that day. In the process of turning
               back to face front, she notices....

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/SIDEWALK -- DAY

               Too fast for us to see, an image of a woman walking a
               Malamute puppy flashes by.

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/PORCH -- NIGHT

               Cleo's POV: a man out walking his dog. He comes to a stop at
               the corner across the street and stands under a streetlight.
               He glances in either direction, and then crosses in the
               direction heading away from her. She never sees his face. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. FATHER'S STUDY -- NEXT DAY

               We see the record sleeve for Bowie's album "Heroes" leaning
               against a long line of other records. The music we hear is
               called "A Sense of Doubt". 

               The record spins on it's wheel.

               Cleo is looking at the back of a different record. Behind
               her, Father enters and goes to his desk.

                                   FATHER
                         What're you up to, Lucy Magoo?

                                   CLEO
                         Listening to your records.

               Father takes a seat at the desk and puts on glasses, tending
               to paperwork.

                                   FATHER
                         David Bowie, huh? Rest in peace.
                         You finally decide to upgrade from
                         that stuff they play at school?

                                   CLEO
                         I listen to everything. You know
                         that. 

                                   FATHER
                         You got that open mind from me, and
                         don't forget it. Bravery too, just
                         don't tell mom I said it or I'll
                         have to hide under the desk. 

               Cleo laughs. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. PORCH/SIDEWALK OF STANFORD'S HOUSE -- DAY

               We follow ROGER STANFORD, an older man in a wheelchair, as he
               rolls out of his front door and onto his porch. There he
               sits, observing the street with no hurry in mind. 

                                   CLEO V.O.
                         How's work going?

                                   FATHER V.O.
                         Too much of it, that's how it's
                         going. I was relieved when you
                         started out a biology major. You
                         can't take a laboratory home with
                         you at night. An accountant is not
                         so lucky. My laboratory fits in a
                         briefcase.



               INT. FATHER'S STUDY -- DAY

                                   FATHER
                         Speaking of nighttime, I want you
                         to start calling me to come and get
                         you from night classes. 

                                   CLEO
                         Why? Did Captain Crunch strike
                         again?

                                   FATHER
                         I'm not laughing. Not until the
                         police get this murder business
                         sorted out.

                                   CLEO
                         Was there another one since
                         yesterday?



               EXT. PORCH/SIDEWALK OF STANFORD'S HOUSE -- DAY

               Stanford idly watches a squad car roll up to the curb about a
               hundred feet from his door and stop. The eyes narrow as...

               A POLICEMAN gets out, a flier in hand, and approaches the
               nearby telephone pole. 

                                   FATHER V.O.
                         Not that I've heard, but what I did
                         hear is that there are similarities
                         in the murders that seem to imply a
                         connection.

                                   CLEO V.O.
                         Like what?

                                   FATHER V.O.
                         They're not saying. Just
                         'similarities'.

                                   CLEO V.O.
                         Mel has night classes, same as me. 

                                   FATHER V.O.
                         Yeah, well, I'm not yet willing to
                         trust Mel with my daughter's
                         safety. He might be a good kid and
                         all--

                                   CLEO V.O.
                         He is a 'good kid', I promise.



               INT. FATHER'S STUDY -- DAY

                                   FATHER
                         I'm sure he is. Just humor me for a
                         few weeks, will you? Put your old
                         man's heart at ease? Call it a
                         favor if you must.



               EXT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/SIDEWALK - DAY

               Stanford rolls down a handicap ramp leading him to the
               sidewalk. We watch him roll himself to the telephone pole.

               New/higher angle: Stanford's POV: the artist's sketch we saw
               on TV the day before. 

               Stanford reaches into his pocket and removes a pair of
               glasses, putting them on. They match the pair worn by the
               face in the sketch. In fact, Stanford looks much like the
               sketch, himself. 

               As he rolls back inside his house, the door closes behind
               him. The angle rises to show a address number carved into a
               piece of wood that looks like a fish. 

                                                           DISSOLVE TO:



               EXT. UNIVERSITY CAMPUS -- DAY [STATIC]



               INT. PSYCHOLOGY WING/OFFICE OF DR. MADDOX -- DAY

               [Important note: Mel and Dr. Maddox wear different clothes in
               the scene they share with Cleo than they do without her, to
               signify different days.]

               Mel appears in the doorway of Dr. Maddox's office... 

               Mel's POV: Dr. Maddox sits on the windowsill, smoking.
               Noticing Mel, he clumsily throws whatever it is out the
               window, exhaling. 

               Mel observes this, querulously. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. CORRIDOR/COLLEGE CAMPUS -- DAY

               Mel escorts Cleo down the corridor to the Psychology Office.

                                   MEL
                         He's a little strange, but anybody
                         else wouldn't have done it for
                         free. 

                                   CLEO
                         Done what for free?

                                   MEL
                         All I want you to do is keep an
                         open mind.

                                   CLEO
                         Ok. And by 'a little strange' you
                         mean ...?

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. MADDOX'S OFFICE -- EARLIER

               Mel sits before the desk of Dr. Maddox.

               Mel's POV: Maddox randomly moves things around on his desk.
               Getting comfortable, he first crosses one leg over the other
               and then reverses to recross with the opposite leg. 



               INT. CORRIDOR/COLLEGE CAMPUS -- DAY

                                   MEL
                         Well, I'm not sure, exactly.
                         Strange-eccentric, not strange
                         crazy. Just keep telling yourself
                         he's a professional. This is not
                         his first rodeo. 

                                   CLEO
                         And by 'rodeo' you mean...?



               INT. MADDOX'S OFFICE -- EARLIER 

                                   MADDOX
                         Ok, I admit I'm intrigued. She'll
                         have to sign some kind of waiver
                         though. We'll call it an
                         experiment, since I don't actually
                         have a license. However, I do have
                         some experience with this.

                                   MEL
                         A waiver? Could something go wrong?

               Maddox appears to consider this possibility or how to
               represent it, seeking counsel inside his head, which leaves
               Mel to...

               ...shift uncomfortably in his seat, observing Maddox with
               subtle dread. Glancing sideways, he sees...

               Mel's POV: a anatomical model of a skeleton stands in his
               blind-spot, wearing a Hawaiian lei, "Blues Brothers" shades,
               a "Party Naked" t-shirt and Detroit Tigers cap.



               INT. CORRIDOR/COLLEGE CAMPUS/MADDOX'S OFFICE -- DAY

               Mel leads Cleo into Maddox's office.

               Maddox is reading something on the screen of his laptop, the
               lid of which he slaps down as Cleo and Mel enter.

                                   MEL
                         Doctor Maddox? This is Cleo. 

               Cleo has noticed the furtive movements, smiling incredulously
               as she shakes Maddox's hand. 

                                   MADDOX
                         Pleased to meet you, Cleo. I'm ...
                         well, what he said. Come right in,
                         nice to see you, and all that. Have
                         a seat. Let's get started.

                                   CLEO
                         What are we starting, exactly?

                                   MADDOX
                             (To Mel)
                         You didn't--

                                   MEL
                         Dr. Maddox, here, can hypnotize you
                         ... if you want.

               Maddox, seeing Cleo is being asked for the first time,
               glances at Mel, slightly confused.

                                   MADDOX
                         I don't know if I--

               Cleo, resolved, takes her jacket off.

                                   CLEO
                         No. It's OK. Let's do it.

               Both men are taken aback. 

                                   MEL
                         You know what you're doing, right,
                         Doc?

                                   MADDOX
                         I know what I'm doing. I'm just not
                         licensed to hypnotize people. I
                         will need you to sign a waiver,
                         however, if we continue.

               Cleo turns, looking down at a sofa buried in books and
               magazines and student's papers. From there, her eyes rise to
               the skeleton in the t-shirt. Her reaction is much the same as
               Mel's, the day before. 

                                   MADDOX (CONT'D)
                         Let me move some of ... well, all
                         of it, out of the way.

               He does so. During his distraction, Cleo and Mel exchange a
               look of "Are you sure?" 

               Mel goes from this, to...

               Mel's POV: the skeleton has a pipe hanging out of his mouth,
               unlike yesterday. 

               Mel does a double-take, but isn't sure what's different about
               the skeleton.

                                   CLEO
                         Where's that waiver?

               Mel sees it laying in the printer tray and hands it to Cleo,
               who glances at it, speed reading.

                                   MEL
                         Maybe we should lock the outer
                         door. Is anyone usually here around
                         this time but you?

                                   MADDOX
                             (Considering)
                         I can find out from Kathy. She'd
                         know.

               Maddox exits and Mel steps over to the computer on the desk
               and lifts the lid. 

               Mel's POV: 3 internet windows are open: the top is a template
               for a downloadable waiver agreement. Sliding that one aside,
               he sees a Wikipedia page for "hypnotism". 

               Mel appears crestfallen.

               Mel's POV: sliding aside the Wiki page, he sees the third is
               a page from Bing Images. Five hundred pictures of Bozo the
               Clown.

               Mel's impression mimics a confused dog. 

               Quickly, he slaps down the lid and slides back to where he
               was standing. He even has the same stance just as Maddox
               comes back in, and shuts the door. 

                                   MADDOX (CONT'D)
                         I can close my door but another
                         professor is going to be in tonight
                         to teach a class, so he's going to
                         need his office. 

               Maddox shuts the door. Cleo is trying to get comfortable on
               the couch. 

                                   MADDOX (CONT'D)
                         Cleo, go ahead and lie down. Mel,
                         I've got to ask that you remain
                         completely quiet during this. 

               Maddox pulls up a chair for Mel, who takes a seat. He takes a
               seat in a chair adjacent to her. He reaches into his pocket
               and removes a crystal that shimmers as it catches the light. 

                                   MADDOX (CONT'D)
                         I want you to stare at this
                         crystal, Cleo, and I'm going to
                         count backward from 100. Slowly,
                         you will begin to feel yourself
                         growing drowsy. Your lids will grow
                         heavy by the count of 80, and by 60
                         they will close completely. By 40,
                         my voice will begin to grow dimmer,
                         and by 20 you will begin to
                         remember your childhood bedroom.
                         By 0, you will be able to vividly
                         describe the way it looked, down to
                         the finest detail. 

                                   CLEO
                         I slept in it last night.

                                   MADDOX
                         But does it still look exactly the
                         same as it did when you were three
                         years old? 

                                   CLEO
                         No. It couldn't have.

                                   MADDOX 
                         And you don't now remember what it
                         looked like when you were three
                         years old, do you?

                                   CLEO
                         Not enough to describe to the last
                         detail, but of course I've seen
                         myself in pictures from the time.

                                   MADDOX
                         Are you ready to go there now?

               Cleo's POV: Maddox holds up the crystal, which shimmers as he
               gradually tilts it back and forth. 

                                   CLEO
                         First tell me why you have a
                         skeleton hanging out in your office
                         when you're not a medical doctor?

                                   MADDOX
                         I need someone to bounce ideas off
                         of.

               Cleo, seeing he's dead serious, lies back with no further
               faith than before, but still remains game.

                                   MADDOX (CONT'D)
                         I'm going to begin counting, Cleo,
                         from 100 ... 99 ... 98 ...

               Cleo watches the crystal, and by 60, her eyes are closing.

               A quick flash of a backyard Barbecue with a banner we can't
               read comes and goes in a blink, followed by other images from
               different times. Photographs begin to change like someone
               demonstrating a flip book. All childhood images. Also, bits
               of film from various memorable events.
               This is nothing too deep, but gradually, the spastic nature
               of the images begins to slow in place, then speed up again,
               then slow. Over this, we hear Maddox counting. By 20, we are
               in...



               INT. CLEO'S BEDROOM/3 YEARS OLD -- DAY

               Cleo, at 3, looks at "us" from the center of the bedroom,
               toys strewn everywhere. The shot lingers for 10 seconds, as
               Maddox's voice grows to its most distant. As it fades
               completely, YOUNG CLEO begins to reach the limit of her
               attention span. She goes to the window and looks outside,
               seeing something that seems to make her happy. She runs out
               of the room, but descends the stairs slowly, determinedly,
               holding the rail tightly.

               At the bottom of the stairs, she runs for the door, opens it
               and runs outside. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. MADDOX'S OFFICE -- DAY

               Maddox is concentrated on what he's doing, Mel looking over
               his shoulder. Both watching...

               POV: Cleo's brow creases.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/PORCH -- DAY

               Cleo, on the porch, gazes jubilantly at...

               Cleo's POV/panning shot: coming down the adjacent street is
               an ice cream truck. Her perspective lingers and then
               continues right, landing on MOM, who's ironing. She turns to
               see her daughter, then follows what must be Cleo's pointing
               finger.

               Cleo's lips move without emitting sound. 

                                   CLEO
                             (Pointing)
                         Mom! Ice cream!

               Mom nods, and turns to look down at her pants pocket. She
               pulls out a $5. As she raises her head again to look at
               Cleo... 

               Mom's POV: Cleo is halfway down the stairs. Coming up the
               sidewalk is a NEIGHBOR LADY walking a beautiful dog. A
               Malamute? Beyond them, so is the a-foreseen truck. 



               INT. TRUCK -- DAY

               The DRIVER sees no one in the road, so reaches over to a
               small cooler, intending to grab lunch. For seconds at a time,
               his eyes leave the road.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/SIDEWALK -- DAY

               The neighbor lady stops as Cleo approaches. Cleo is overjoyed
               to see the dog, probably with some familiarity. Perhaps it
               licks her face.

               We see a C.U. of the dog's leash held by the neighbor lady's
               finger, not whole hand. The truck is coming up the street
               from behind her.

               Mom is waving down the ice cream man, descending the stairs.



               INT. TRUCK -- DAY

               With still no one in the truck's path, the driver makes a
               final lunge for his cooler, and this time looks away too
               long.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/SIDEWALK -- DAY

               The neighbor lady is knelt down, holding the dog so Cleo can
               play with it, but looking up at Cleo's mom, about to say hi
               and wave as soon as Mom looks back her way. She isn't
               expecting Cleo to make a grab for the leash, which she does.

               In the second between leaving the neighbor lady's finger and
               being grasped fully by Cleo, the dog breaks free and runs
               into the street.

               Neighbor Lady notices the truck coming, finally, and sees her
               dog running in front of it. She doesn't expect Cleo to run
               after the dog, and is off-balance, falling as Cleo clears the
               reach of her grasp.

               From the stairs, Mom is now fully aware that she has no
               chance of stopping what's about to happen. She screams,
               without sound. The music of the ice cream truck has now
               reached it's pinnacle of volume.

               The neighbor lady screams, too, without audio, and gets to
               her feet clumsily. Behind her, from the front door of the
               house next door, the NEIGHBOR bursts out and leaps to the
               bottom of the steps. 



               INT. TRUCK -- DAY

               The Driver secures his cooler and drags it over, finally
               looking up to the street again, where he sees... 

               ...a dog crossing the street dragging its leash. He stands on
               his brakes.



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/STREET -- DAY

               The sound of the brakes SCREECHING distracts Cleo, and she
               stops, looking to the grill bearing down on her. 

               We see a man's arm reach into frame and scoop up Cleo.

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. MADDOX'S OFFICE -- DAY

               Cleo sits up with eyes wide open. 

               Maddox actually falls backward, off his chair. Mel moves in
               closer.

               Cleo is breathing hard, seeing the images fade yet trying to
               hang onto them.

                                   MEL 
                         Are you ok?

               Cleo nods, but has no words yet.

               Maddox sets his chair back up and sits.

                                   MADDOX
                         Are you--?

               A rapping on the door cuts him off.

                                   KATHY
                         You ok, Al?

                                   MADDOX
                         Yes, sure. I just tripped.

               Kathy accepts this.

                                   CLEO 
                         Why did I just wake up?

                                   MADDOX
                         Because I didn't suggest that you
                         wouldn't. It's quite common to wake
                         up during hypnosis, unless the
                         hypnotist plants instructions
                         otherwise. 

                                   CLEO
                             (To Mel)
                         I was there. So was someone else.
                         Come on, we need to go. Thank you,
                         Doctor.

               Cleo and Mel leave Maddox.

               Walking past the skeleton on his way to his desk, he removes
               the pipe from its mouth and puts it in his own. 

                                   MADDOX
                             (To the skeleton)
                         Told you I could do it. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. SIDEWALK -- DAY

               Mel and Cleo walk along the sidewalk briskly.

                                   MEL
                         Why can't you just ask your mom
                         about all this?

                                   CLEO
                         Her and my dad are hiding
                         something. I think I have a right
                         to know. 

                                   MEL
                         So what exactly are you trying to
                         find?

                                   CLEO 
                         Someone saved my life and I want to
                         know who it was. I think I need to
                         thank them. 

                                   MEL
                         And you say this lady will know
                         him?

                                   CLEO 
                         She'll know something. She was
                         there. I want to know if someone
                         died to save my life.

                                   MEL
                         Why wouldn't your Mom or Dad just
                         tell you that? 

                                   CLEO
                         That's our mystery, isn't it?

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. MRS. BIRCH'S FRONT PORCH -- DAY

               Mel and Cleo stand outside the door, waiting for it to open.

               A young woman does so. This is LISA, Mrs. Birch's daughter. 

                                   LISA
                         Cleo? I don't believe my eyes! How
                         long has it been?

               Lisa opens the screen door and embraces Cleo. 

                                   CLEO
                         Vacation Bible School. We gave
                         little kids lemonade and cookies. 

               Lisa laughs.

                                   LISA
                         And we were less than ten years
                         older ourselves. Come in! Come in!
                         You have to see Mom.

               Their voices disappear inside the house.

                                   LISA (CONT'D)
                         Mom, look who's here!

               The screen door closes behind them.



               INT. MRS. BIRCH'S BACK PATIO -- DAY

               MRS. BIRCH is in her seventies. She sits comfortably on a
               lawn chair. Besides her sits a full grown Malamute.  

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         Hypnotism, huh? Wow! I've always
                         wanted to see what that was like.
                         How was it? 

                                   CLEO
                         A little scary, to be honest. But
                         that was how I found out you were
                         there, walking your dog. 

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         Oh, yes. That was Rascal. He was
                         such a sweetheart. 

                                   CLEO
                         So he didn't get hit by the truck?

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         Oh, no! He lived a long and happy
                         life. Lord, how he loved to chase
                         things. This one's Samson. He loves
                         his muh-muh, doesn't he?

               The dog in some way to confirms this.

                                   CLEO
                         Mrs. Birch, I woke up before I
                         could see who threw me to the curb
                         and saved my life.

               Mrs. Birch grows darker, petting Samson.  

                                   MRS. BIRCH 
                         He was a policeman. Lived across
                         the street from you guys. He was
                         home for his lunch hour and was
                         coming out to get in his squad car.
                         I'd noticed him while walking, but
                         then I got to you, and Rascal was
                         just as happy to see you as you
                         were to see him. Most days in
                         Summer, it was your daily
                         rendezvous. When I showed him the
                         leash before we stepped out, I'd
                         say, "let's go see Cleo? Wanna see
                         Cleo?"

                                   CLEO
                         Did you know his name?

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         Sure; I knew everybody in the
                         neighborhood to some extent.
                         Roger ... Stanford. He and his wife
                         got a divorce and both moved away.
                         There were rumors he used to get
                         rough with her. 

                                   CLEO
                         Rumors?

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         Well, your mom said some of his co
                         workers had to show up in the
                         middle of the night, more than
                         once. I heard from the Dawsons,
                         next door to them, the Stanford's
                         were always yelling at each other;
                         him the loudest, of course. Kimmy
                         Dawson once told me after a fight,
                         Roger took off and she could hear
                         Angie crying. It was in the Spring:
                         too chilly to turn the air on yet,
                         too warm to keep the windows
                         closed. Good "sleeping" weather.

                                   CLEO
                         So, you probably don't know where
                         they moved, huh?

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         You want to thank him for saving
                         your life. 

                                   CLEO 
                         I would. Yes.

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         What'd your mama say about all
                         this?

                                   MEL
                         I'd be the one to meet him first,
                         Mrs. Birch.

               Cleo subtly shoots a glance at Mel that says, "Oh, really?"

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         That's probably a good idea.
                         Courteous, not suspicious, if you
                         put it across right.

                                   CLEO
                         Why would we be suspicious?

               MR. BIRCH and Lisa join the others on the back patio. Mr.
               Birch is carrying hamburger patties on a plate in one hand
               and a spatula in the other. Lisa follows him with a bag of
               buns, cheese and some spices. 

                                   MR. BIRCH
                         Game time! Everybody take cover!

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         There's no way to stop him. Don't
                         even try. 

                                   MR. BIRCH
                         How do you kids want your burgers?

               Cleo and Mel share a glance.

                                   CLEO
                         Oh ... we wouldn't want to
                         impose...

                                   MRS. BIRCH 
                         Nonsense. You'll no sooner get out
                         of here without eating than you'll
                         get him to miss a Tigers game.  

                                   MR. BIRCH
                         I had a dream last night that
                         they're going to start winning
                         soon!

               Lisa leaves her stuff by the grill and comes over to join her
               mother and guests. In the background, we hear the game
               playing. 

                                   LISA
                         What'd I miss? Hope it wasn't
                         classified.

                                   MEL
                         We're trying to track down the
                         Stanford's that used to live across
                         from Cleo.

                                   LISA
                         Penny was in my class, at least
                         until she went to live with her
                         grandparents. 

                                   CLEO
                         Why'd she do that?

                                   LISA
                         I don't think I ever found out. We
                         weren't necessarily close or
                         anything. 

               Cleo looks to Mrs. Birch, whose disposition has darkened a
               little more. 

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         I never heard that one before.
                         Interesting.

               Cleo can see that...

               Mrs. Birch is lying. 

                                   LISA
                         I had the impression she didn't
                         have it so good at home. I would've
                         asked, not that it was any of my
                         business, but you don't necessarily
                         think of such things in the third
                         grade. In fact, I saw her a week or
                         so ago at Kroger. 

               No one sees Mrs. Birch's deepening sense of dread, this time,
               but us. 

                                   LISA (CONT'D)
                         We exchanged numbers, but I haven't
                         called her and she hasn't called
                         me. 

                                   CLEO
                         Will you call her for me? Or I can.
                         I'm looking for her father.

                                   LISA
                         I don't see why not. Why her
                         father?

               As we see that Mrs. Birch's sense of concern has deepened
               further, we hear Mr. Birch in the background.

                                   MR. BIRCH
                         Hop-skippety!! That's a double!!

                                   CLEO
                         He saved my life when I was about 3
                         or 4.

               Lisa's eyebrows go up.

                                   LISA
                         I hope you'll tell me that story
                         sometime.

               Lisa pulls out her phone and calls Angie. Doing so, she
               stands and wanders off to hold the conversation.

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         I sure am glad you came by today,
                         hon. It's been such a long time!

               Cleo smiles and pats Mrs. Birch's hand. 

                                   MRS. BIRCH (CONT'D)
                         I'm just worried about you finding
                         this guy. I always had the feeling
                         Roger was a little ... unstable, if
                         you know what I mean.

                                   MEL
                         You mean by the way he treated his
                         wife?

               Mrs. Birch considers her answer carefully.

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         That was part of it. It's just ...
                         I don't know. Maybe the years have
                         mellowed him out some. I do hope
                         so, if you're planning to pay him a
                         visit.

                                   CLEO
                         I'm only there to thank him. How
                         can I not try?

                                   MRS. BIRCH 
                         Just promise me you'll take your
                         friend with you. Mel, is it?

                                   MEL 
                         Yep. 

                                   CLEO
                         I'll be brief, say my piece, and
                         go.

               Lisa returns, hanging up.

                                   LISA
                         We're going to have coffee this
                         week sometime.
                         She says her father moved away for
                         years and then moved back here. He
                         lives over on the other side of
                         town. 

                                   MR. BIRCH
                             (In the background)
                         You bum! You want to go home early,
                         is that it?

               Everyone cracks a grin or stifles a giggle at this, all
               except Mrs. Birch.

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         He lost his legs.

               Cleo's smile evaporates.

                                   MRS. BIRCH (CONT'D)
                         He threw you out of the way. But
                         the truck hit him. Just on the
                         corner, but enough to drag him
                         under the tire. 

               Cleo's jaw drops. Everyone is dead serious now.

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. THE STANFORD RESIDENCE -- DAY

               We see ROGER STANFORD, dressed in his uniform, just about to
               open his driver's door to get in when he looks backward and
               sees...

               Roger's POV: the truck coming down the street.

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. MRS. BIRCH'S BACK PATIO -- DAY

               Cleo blinks rapidly, not ready for this memory. It's passing
               is so fast as to race a bullet.

                                   MRS. BIRCH
                         I won't mince words, honey. Not
                         since you're going over there. That
                         man was as mean as a snake, and
                         that was before he was confined to
                         a wheelchair for the rest of his
                         life. Maybe some things are best
                         left where they lay.

               Cleo's eyes reflect the heightened stakes of the situation,
               but doesn't say anything.

                                   MR. BIRCH
                         You-reka (Eureka)!! That's what I'm
                         talkin' about!

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/SIDEWALK

               Mel and Cleo pull up in Cleo's car. Mel rides shotgun. They
               both...

               POV: eye the house. 

                                   MEL
                         I don't know about this.

                                   CLEO
                         I'm not afraid. I come in peace.
                         He'll see that.

                                   MEL
                         You don't know what he'll see if
                         he's unbalanced.

                                   CLEO
                         Well, what do I say if you go up
                         first? Gee, Mr. Stanford, we
                         weren't sure it was safe? We
                         thought you might flip out?

                                   MEL
                         You have your phone. Set up a text
                         and hit send if you need me.

                                   CLEO
                         Ok, Roy Rogers.

               Cleo gets out and walks up to the house.

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. STANFORD'S HOUSE -- DAY

               Peeking through Venetian blinds...

               Stanford's POV: watching Cleo approach. 



               EXT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/PORCH -- DAY

               Cleo rings the doorbell, her eyes rising idly...

               Cleo's POV: ...to the fish-shaped address sign above the
               door.

               Cleo jumps slightly when the door opens abruptly. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Not buyin' !

                                   CLEO
                         Mr. Stanford, my name's Cleo Riley.
                         Do you remember me? I wanted to see
                         if I could talk to you.

               The end of a cane comes into view and pushes the door open
               all the way. In the shadows, Cleo can see a man wearing
               glasses, confined to a wheelchair. 

                                   CLEO (CONT'D)
                         I don't know if--

                                   STANFORD
                         I know you. 

               He fully rolls into view. With the sun going down over Cleo's
               shoulder, he has to squint, tilting his head back a bit.

                                   CLEO
                         You want me to move over?

                                   STANFORD
                         No, no. I can't see you at all if
                         you stand in front of it. Come on
                         in.

               He pushes open the screen door for her and Cleo takes it,
               heading in. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. STANFORD'S STREET/CURB -- DAY

               Mel sits behind the wheel now, parked a little further up the
               street, near the curb. He's watching her in the rearview
               mirror. He's not happy she's going inside.

                                   MEL
                         Of course she is!

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/KITCHEN -- EVENING

               Stanford rolls into the kitchen, Cleo following. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Have a seat. You want some coffee,
                         or I got tea.

                                   CLEO
                         Um, coffee would be great.

                                   STANFORD
                         How d'you take it?

                                   CLEO
                         Not picky. However you take yours.

                                   STANFORD
                         Why?...We ain't the same.

               Cleo blinks, not having meant offense. 

                                   CLEO
                         I'm ... sorry. I didn't--

                                   STANFORD
                         Two sugars, I bet. I drink mine
                         black. Nobody wants my coffee
                         black, I can assure you. I wouldn't
                         let my worst enemy drink it, and
                         you are far from that. Now, creamer
                         ... that's a tough one. I'd bet my
                         last quarter you've got a sweet
                         tooth, but it doesn't look like you
                         let it get the best of you.

               Cleo chuckles politely. 

                                   CLEO
                         You're right. I never take cream,
                         but I do put in two Sweet n' Lows.
                         You nailed it.

               Stanford turns the chair, with her coffee in hand, and brings
               it to the table. 

               Cleo's POV: Stanford never makes eye contact, before turning
               himself back to the counter to pour his own. 

                                   CLEO (CONT'D)
                         So I hear you used to be a cop.

               Stanford freezes, this time, half-turning.

                                   STANFORD
                         What do you mean?

               Cleo feels herself caught in another verbal faux pa, lost for
               words.

                                   STANFORD (CONT'D)
                         My daughter told you how to find
                         me.

                                   CLEO
                         Yes. She said she was going to call
                         you.

                                   STANFORD
                         She did. She tell you I used to be
                         a cop, too?

                                   CLEO
                         No, I mean, I already knew that--

                                   STANFORD
                         And I'm askin' how?

                                   CLEO
                         People remember you, Mr. Stanford.
                         I just asked around. A friend of
                         mine bumped into your daughter a
                         while back and they exchanged
                         numbers.

               Stanford turns back to the table, his coffee in one hand. He
               rolls forward.

                                   STANFORD
                         I'm sorry if I seem gruff. They
                         changed my meds again. Makes me
                         sleep like crap. I just didn't
                         think anybody still remembered me.
                         That came as quite a shock. People
                         used to give me the stink-eye in
                         that neighborhood. I wasn't too sad
                         about leaving finally.

                                   CLEO
                         Is it hard for cops? People tighten
                         up around you, keep you out of the
                         cliques. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Cops keep together. I always had
                         friends. You're not wrong, though.
                         You can't pull up behind someone in
                         a squad car without the person in
                         front of you getting nervous. They
                         drive slower; I was forever passing
                         people. It's a minor annoyance.
                         Was. 

                                   CLEO
                         Did you stop being a cop?

               Stanford leans back, now eyeing her fully. The expression
               might indicate a limit to his allowance for familiarity. 

                                   STANFORD
                         What do you do?

                                   CLEO
                         I'm in college. Studying Political
                         Science.

                                   STANFORD
                         What do you do with that degree? Go
                         to Washington?

                                   CLEO
                         I could. I want to teach, at some
                         point. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Maybe run for office some day.

               It isn't clear whether he's scoffing or enjoying the idea.

                                   CLEO
                         I don't know, I guess. I just care
                         about government. It seems like
                         things don't get fixed fast enough.

                                   STANFORD
                         Corruption.

               Cleo seems uncertain how to respond.

                                   STANFORD (CONT'D)
                         That's why. Too many people make
                         too much money from things not
                         working. People get into office and
                         then someone comes in with a big
                         suitcase full of cash. That would
                         give anyone pause. We can't help
                         it. None of us. Basic instincts:
                         self-preservation. And you need
                         money in this world to survive.
                         As long as that's the means to
                         survive, nothing will get fixed;
                         not completely. Wars. Millions of
                         people out of work if we don't have
                         one. McCain said we'd stay in Iraq
                         for 100 years. I don't blame him. I
                         don't blame any thief for doing
                         what they do. You gotta eat. Beg,
                         steal, or borrow, they say. 

               Cleo is lost in this rant.

                                   STANFORD (CONT'D)
                         What's the most you would do to
                         survive?

                                   CLEO
                         It depends.

                                   STANFORD
                         On what?

                                   CLEO
                         On whether my dying might save
                         somebody else.

                                   STANFORD
                         Ah. A hero. Is that you?

                                   CLEO
                         I don't know. I've never been in
                         the position to make that decision.
                         I think I would risk my life to
                         save someone, yes. I bet you had to
                         do that all the time as a cop.

                                   STANFORD
                         You don't know anything about me,
                         Miss Cleo Riley from Baker Street.
                         You're not jaded enough by life to
                         feel evil standing behind you.
                         Looking over your shoulder. 

                                   CLEO
                         Are you evil?

                                   STANFORD 
                         I think all of us are, under the
                         right circumstances. Same basic
                         instincts. There were no Hallmark
                         stores at the dawn of man, but we
                         would damn sure kill the fool that
                         tried to steal our food.
                         All that fool wants to do is eat,
                         to keep breathing, but so do you.
                         If he eats your food, you might die
                         before you can find more. It's not
                         in our nature to just hand things
                         over because other people need
                         them. It's in us to be mean, it's
                         only the reasons that change. 

                                   CLEO
                         You gave your legs for me. Why?
                         Didn't you need them anymore?

               Stanford is plainly deciding whether or not to be offended.

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/STREET -- NEAR DARK

               Mel sees a set of headlights approaching in the rearview
               mirror and watches a white van slow before pulling into
               Stanford's driveway. His expression belies a desire to act
               now.



               INT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/KITCHEN -- NEAR DARK

                                   STANFORD
                         I was a different person.

                                   CLEO
                         Maybe so. But there's no way to
                         lose yourself completely. If it was
                         there once, it's still there now. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Confucius, are you? By college, no
                         less: that's impressive. 

                                   CLEO
                         You demonstrated you were good. Or
                         I wouldn't be sitting here today.

                                   STANFORD
                         If I had to do it over again? I
                         don't know. 

                                   CLEO
                         That's fair. But you did do it when
                         it counted. 

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. FAMILY HOME/SIDEWALK -- DAY

               3 year-old Cleo is rolling in the grass as Mom rushes up to
               her.

               The truck is stopped, askew in the street. Stanford lays
               unconscious near the front end. Mrs. Birch (Neighbor Lady)
               stands up, staring over the roof of the car next to them in
               shock. 

               The Malamute puppy runs around the back of the truck,
               practically leaping into Mrs. Birch's arms.

               Mom covers Cleo's eyes and pulls her head in, belatedly
               trying to get her daughter to un-see what has just happened
               in front of her. She is sobbing with relief. 

               The Driver is out in the street, mortified by all that's
               happened. He is joined by the guy who ran out of his house to
               assist. They tend to Stanford for seconds, and then the
               neighbor runs back into his house, presumably to call an
               ambulance.

               The last shot is Cleo, at her current age, watching all of
               this from a position in the shadows of the porch steps.

                                                                CUT TO:



               INT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/STREET -- NIGHT

                                   STANFORD
                         I've done more than enough bad
                         since then to over-rule throwing
                         you from in front of a car. I used
                         up all my credit from that one. 

               A KNOCK at a side door to the house draws the attention of
               both. Cleo jumps a little. 

               Without waiting for someone to answer, the side door opens
               and a man in a white delivery outfit walks in almost like he
               owns the place. He's near the stairs heading down to the
               basement, backing in with a two-wheel hand-cart full of
               boxes. He doesn't see either of the kitchen's occupants, who
               both watch him. 

                                   DEVLIN
                         They didn't have those muffins you
                         like so much; said they'd be
                         getting a new shipment soon--

                                   STANFORD
                         Meet Cleo! Cleo, meet Devlin. He
                         delivers my groceries.

               Devlin stops, turning his head sharply to stare directly at
               Cleo. 

                                   DEVLIN
                         You have company, I see. I can just
                         take this stuff downstairs.

                                   STANFORD 
                         Yeah, you do that, Dev. I'll be
                         down in a minute.

               Devlin departs.

                                   CLEO
                         I'm sorry. I'm taking up too much
                         of your time. I should probably go. 

                                   STANFORD
                         Conscience all clear, then?

                                   CLEO
                         Nobody made me come here, Mr.
                         Stanford. I just didn't want you to
                         think the person you sacrificed so
                         much for is ungrateful. I owe every
                         day to what you did, and I just
                         wanted you to know that I know
                         that. I will never forget you, Mr.
                         Stanford.

                                   STANFORD
                         No good deed goes unpunished, huh?

                                   CLEO
                         Raking somebody's yard is a good
                         deed. I hope I'll be so lucky as to
                         save someone else's life someday,
                         under conditions where it all
                         depends on me. I would feel blessed
                         that God gave me that much power.
                         You're right about a lot of people
                         being bad, or evil. They tell
                         themselves they don't have any
                         choice, either. But you had a
                         choice. You could've just stood
                         there and watched me die. There was
                         no time to think. Nothing drove you
                         but instinct. Base instincts, just
                         like you said.
                         To me, you're a hero. Live a long
                         life, Mr. Stanford. Because of you,
                         I will. 

               She turns to the door but stops before leaving, turning back. 

                                   CLEO (CONT'D)
                         Thank you, Mr. Stanford, for every
                         good thing that lays ahead of me. I
                         owe you for every minute of it.

               Cleo leaves, closing the door behind her. We hear the screen
               door BANG finally.

               Stanford watches the closed door for several seconds, then
               turns away, thinking. 

               Behind him, we hear steps rapidly ascending the basement
               stairs.

                                   DEVLIN
                             (Agitated)
                         Who the hell was that?

                                   STANFORD
                         Nobody.

                                   DEVLIN
                         Yeah? Just someone you're letting
                         walk away with a good look at your
                         face. Why was she here in the first
                         place?

                                   STANFORD
                         She's nothing to us. I'm telling
                         you not to worry about her.

               Devlin is at the door, hand on the knob. 

                                   DEVLIN
                         You're not thinking--

                                   STANFORD
                         Dev, look at me. I need to tell you
                         something and it can't wait--

               Devlin stops and starts to turn back.

                                                                CUT TO:



               EXT. STANFORD'S HOUSE/LAWN

               Cleo is heading toward her car. From out of the shadows near
               the porch steps, Mel emerges and catches up to her from
               behind, nearly causing her to leap out of her skin.

                                   CLEO
                         Jesus Lord, Mary and Joseph! Say
                         something first!

                                   MEL
                         Sorry, sorry. What happened in
                         there?

               They each hear a a GUNSHOT from inside the house and whirl
               around. Fortunately, Mel grabs Cleo as she starts back to the
               house.

                                   CLEO
                             (Tearing up)
                         I think he just shot himself! We
                         have to call someone!

                                   MEL
                         Call anybody you want, but not from
                         here. We're leaving. There's
                         nothing you can do if he did!

               She refuses, nature insisting she try and help. He has to
               grab her around the waist, lift her off the ground, and carry
               her thrashing back to her car. As we watch them go, the angle
               pans back to Stanford's house. After a beat, the same shot
               tracks forward, "walking" alongside the house to the back.
               Halfway there, we see someone running at full speed from the
               back of the house; a woman, running as though her life
               depends on it. She has huge strips of gray electrical tape
               dangling from both wrists and both angles. We have a long
               time to watch her go, to appreciate how desperate her
               situation is. Finally, we come to the corner and turn it to
               see an open back door through which she ran. When Stanford
               emerges from the shadows inside, he is leaning on the cane we
               saw earlier. Over his other shoulder is a gym bag. In his
               free hand are Devlin's keys. 

               Watching her go for a second or two, he finally leaves,
               satisfied with his observation of the woman's escape. We then
               track him around the back of the house and around to the
               driveway. We watch as he gets in the van, backs out, and
               leaves frame left. We are left to stare at the empty street
               for two more seconds before...

                                                              FADE OUT:



               TITLE: "HEROES" 

               Roll credits to David Bowie's song "Heroes" in German.