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Dramatic Literary Works from the Haven Pantheon:

What is "Dramatic Literary"?

 

 

Dramatic Literary works are stories that keep us engrossed almost like a thriller, but in and of themselves aren't thrillers. "Thrillers" traditionally refer to stories including heroes, villains, damsels/heroines, and (often) exotic locales. "Dramatic Literary" refers to a type of story where the hero/heroine is in some kind of peril, but that peril may only exist in their own minds. For example, in Flip City Blues, the hero is a man in his thirties recently released from an asylum who remains enslaved by his own imagination. Though his life may become threatened by external forces during his reassimilation to society, his odyssey doesn't start out in any apparent danger. The "perils" inherent to a thriller aren't immediately obvious; they kind of sneak up on you. In "All the Great Places," we visit a young couple who've taken to the road to "find themselves" or, perhaps, a kind of mythical peace. "The Revelation Sessions" presents a similar backdrop for an aged songwriter beckoned out of retirement to produce one last masterpiece. "Leave the Lights On..." and "This Will Save You" present a sense of looming unrest, but no one's life is ever at stake. This usually can't be said of the traditional "thriller," which often includes cops, killers, or combinations of the two, set in places as diverse as inner cities or halls of power. The sense of disaster inherent to a thriller often leads to someone's demise, whereas "Dramatic Literary" often presents a dillemma not necessarily lethal, but instead a road to catharsis. Below are a series of books and music that guided me in my understanding of "soul" as a state of being, as a state of perception. By those with the inherent ability to  sense the proximity of something intangible (like soul), scroll down to read about some of my sources of inspiration, pointing out some places where you can find it, too. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many people associate Springsteen with hit singles of the

eighties (Born In The USA, Glory Days, I'm On Fire, etc.), but the man has more underrated songs than almost anyone else in the music business. Listen to "Independence Day" from The River, or "Youngstown" from The Ghost of Tom Joad. Listen to "Racing in the Street" from Darkness On The Edge of Town, or "Rosalita," from The Wild, The Innocent and the E Street Shuffle, or "Born to Run."
My own story, "All the Great Places," is an homage to the effect Springsteen's music has had on me and my creative development: showing me that someone else out there felt the way I felt.
 

Flip City Blues


                                                         

This one has a thriller-angle that's obvious toward the end of the story, but then hopefully offers a second once the unnamed protagonist senses the close proximity of a new revelation. Subtextually, it's my interpretation of a writer who believes his work means something, that he/she was put on earth to do what they're doing and then re-form it for public consumption. In this case, the fact that the protagonist is a writer is a superfluous disguise, and the end, he senses that his ambitions might've been misguided all along. This was a conundrum familiar when I was younger, specifically between the ages of 16 and 20, when I took myself the most seriously. What if I was missing the real purpose, not realizing writing should be anything more than a hobby. This feeling was brought on by some of those around me, such as my parents, who believed for thirty years that it was all just a faze, and I'd grow out of it; as though writing was like exhibiting a love for heavy metal music (another faze I never grew out of).

 

(from The Night Show, Vol. 3: Crackpot Visionaries)

 

                 "All the Great Places"

 

 

"Diversion Street"

                                                            (from The Night Show, Vol. 1: The Great American Night

 

"Leave the Lights On Behind You"

 

"This Will Save You"

(from The Night Show, Vol. 3: Crackpot Visionaries)

 

 

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                                                            (from The Night Show, Vol. 1: The Great American Night